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Along that Yellow Brink Road Pt 2.5

As I was making my way through what is left of the Oz series, I realized that I missed an installment. Being the completionist that I am, I of course had to go back and read The Woggle-Bug Book. It takes places, directly after the second book, The Marvelous Land of Oz, I think. To be honest, I don’t know why this book exists, and book is being very generous.

This fanfiction of a short story is about how Mr. Insect-with-too-many-names-to-be-taken-seriously somehow ends up in America, I think, and tries to by a wife because he like a dress. And then some other things happened. I’m also pretty surer there was a random section with a dash a racism but I was just trying to get through to the end. It sounded stupid, and I’m pretty sure that if I put any actually though into it I would cry because of it. Just take my advice. This “book” isn’t worth your sanity. Literally do anything else.

Escaping the Underworld

Imagine this: you are trapped in the underworld with your father, but what to do anything to escape, including taking down hordes of enemies in the way and getting help from your estranged family members. That is Hades in a nutshell. This is an action-packed room-based procedurally generated game taking place in the Underworld of Greek Mythology as you follow Zagreus, son of Hades, in trying to reach the surface.

Not only is the game gorgeous and amazingly voice-acted, but the action is also very seamless and responsive. It could be because I’m used to crappy computers, but I am used to playing action games that do nothing but stutter and take seconds before a response from the on-screen character. I recently got this game on the switch, and now I am saving up all my money possible to buy a better computer so I can feel this fantastic playing an action game in the future. I just don’t want to stop playing because of the fantastic gameplay and heart-touching story I wasn’t expecting. I would highly recommend anyone picking up this beautifully made game.

An Entirely New World Pt 3

I finally got around to reading the third book in the Chronicles of Narnia series, and I gotta say, I was not worth it. More characters that you won’t carry about show up nor get even a page of description. All of our “favorite” character’s weren’t even then because Peter was off at school and Susan was busy finding a husband. The common things we’re looking forward to in a fantasy series.

In time, instead of sitting around listening to a story, we’re sitting around on a boat. Why? Because Aslan told us to. With nonsense side plots that make no sense? Absolutely. At times, the story felts like an Oz book with the random tangents of fantasy Dorothy had to go on. It wasn’t worth the time it took to read. Am I happy our “favorite” family won’t be going back to Narnia, and we’ll hear someone else’s story? Yes, yes, and more yes. The four we’ve learned to “love” should have stopped after their first adventure.

Studio Ghibli Made a Video Game

Like the title says, the Studio Ghibli’s beautiful style haws been added to a video game, or something that you could call a video game. Don’t get me wrong, I love it, but I would definitely say that it is not for everyone. Ni no Kuni: Cross Worlds boasts itself as a MMORPG featuring some classic classes such as witches, rangers, and swordsmen. I, of course, chose a witch to “play” as.

To be honest, this is more a beautiful cinematic that you enjoy to watch with a side of research management. I large part of the game is managing your inventory and leveling up your weapons and pets. I really am enjoying the story beats, but if you are looking for a hardcore MMORPG in which every single button press effects the action, this is not the game for you. If you want something mindless to do and just want the pretty colors go by like I do, you might really enjoy it. There are some customizations options, but all the classes are gender- and race-locked, so be prepared for everyone looking more or less the same.

The game is available in the Apple and Google Play store. There also seems to be a pretty active PC port if that is your cup of tea. I am currently a level sixty witch, and even though at times it’s a grind, I haven’t felt the need to buy experience boosts are anything, so I do think it is pretty balanced in a way. Of course that fact that you can buy stuff is thrown in your face every couple of levels, it’s not necessary to continue.

The History of Our Evolution

Sometimes, we all just need to read a book that answers the question of “how did we get here.” Other times, it’s a question of how in the world has humanity not destroyed the world five times over by now. I’m still surprised that half the US hasn’t gone up in flames with people announcing the sex f their almost babies. Anyway, the answers to both those questions and more are answered in Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari.

On top of explaining some of the important advances in human evolution, such as the scam that was the Agricultural Revolution, it also asks questions that I don’t think many people think about. Such as assuming imperialism is bad, is there really any way of getting rid of the effects, or are we just doomed to live with it? How money came about is still super confusing to me, but it is still interesting to me how it came about. I still don’t understand lots of things, but it was really interesting reading some thoughts about the last couple of thousands of years that the human species have been on the earth. If you like history of any kind, I’m positive you’ll love this book.

Singing Your Heart Out

A lot of the time, singing in written media does not connect the way it should. You cannot hear the heart behind the words while sometimes you are just told the feelings that you’re supposed to feel. That is not the case with Full Moon o Sagashite by Arina Tanemura. Maybe it is just that medium of manga the lends to it so well, but it has so much heart and soul.

Full Moon follows Mitsuki, a girl who loves singing but has throat cancer that is preventing her from pursuing a career. Enter Shinigami, gods of death, who believe that giving her the ability to follow her dreams will allow her to peacefully go with them. On top of this seemingly basic plot line, there are many twists and turns that leave your heart racing and unable to put down a volume until the very end. While this manga was amazing, one of the best that I have ever read, there are some serious topics discussed which are impossible to say without giving plot away, so do take care while reading. I’m almost certain you will love the story.

Murder High School

Think about it: going to high school, only to be locked in, and finding a body a couple of days in. You would think that it’s out of this world, but instead it’s Danganronpa. I’ve played the first two games as my computer can’t handle the third, but I absolutely loved every moment that I played.

Danganronpa is an insane story with so many plot twists that revolve around solving murders in a think-tank style of accusing everyone without having a single piece of evidence or shred of logic. The characters are lovable and hate-able and each have their own unique characteristics that make getting to know each character an experience. There is also an amazing villain to top everything off. If you are not into learning more about the characters, you can skip this. The art style is unique in that everything seems 2D in a 3D world while other parts stick with the typical animal style with a sprinkle other others. Ether way, it is a gorgeous experience, but do know that there are some very dark themes that I don’t know if I could explain without major spoilers.

Semester 4 Grad School Reflection

Guys, I’m back after a much longer hiatus than I was expecting to. I was hoping that I would just put things off for a bit before getting back to things, but that’s not what happened. It’s actually what I was doing this semester that kept me from my planned activities.

This semester, I was preparing for my qualifying exam. One of three major steps in getting my Ph.D. Looking back, it probably wasn’t the biggest deal, but I was pretty stressed out about it, and did nothing but study until my eyes could not look at a screen anymore. The way mine went, since department and universities, can have different requirements, was that each professor on my committee would ask me a question where I was given a week to respond and then had a verbal component to expand on the answer. They could ask me anything that had been covered during my course work. Anything I learned over the last two years could have been on this exam, so I went into hyperdrive doing nothing but studying it felt like. But in the end, it worked out because I passed my qualifying exam, so I guess everything was fine. I just crashed for the next two weeks and did nothing of substance. But, yeah, totally fine.

Learning Money the Nerdy Way

Every year, I try to read at least one book on financial literacy. Here, in the US, it is a sorely undertaught subject, that really should. The first time I had to fill out a tax return, I was nearly sent into a panic attack. I do my best, not to understand everything there is to know, but I want to at least understand the basics. There are people who go to school for years to actually understand everything this. This time around, I read Stacked: You Super-Serious Guide to Modern Money Management Joe Saul-Sehy and Emily Guy Birken.

The “super-serious” book is written in the style of one of my old girl scout badge manuals. It gives all of the basics of personal finance without going to far in depth requiring your to constantly look things up. There are also “achievements” for every aspect of going through your finances. It gives you step-by-step guide on how you should handle researching for yourself the best strategies to implement. There is no size fits all method, but at least there is some comic relief from the musings of the very nerdy authors (my favorite kind). I would definitely suggest reading this book whether it is your first ever personal finance book or you need a refresher. It’s not dry, and will keep you every engaged.

Kings of the Island

I’ve been making my way through several older novels that have been on my “to-read” list for what feels like years now. The book I decided to conquer next was Lord of the Flies by William Golding. This classic novel was a trip and a half, discussing the fragility of human nature and groupthink in a pseudo-World War III situation. Apparently, this was a rewriting of another book, but written as a way to make the children more “realistic.” Reading this, I’ve noticed several things about myself. I am not the biggest fan of dystopian novels. If you do, you may want to take the next section with a grain of salt.

The book follows the exploit of a group of boys as they crash land on an inhabited island. The entire time, I felt I was yelling at the characters for their quick descent into madness. I don’t know if it was the fact that it was a short novel or the fact that you had to imagine everything happening in a shorter amount of time than what really happened. I do find the concepts behind groupthink in a more academic sense. I found The Lucifer Effect fascinating because of every fact, but the senselessness got to me. I know that it was supposed to make a point in many ways, but maybe I just would like to believe that children are not as cruel as Golding made them out to be in this novel. I think, in many ways, I was more horrified than interested in the character development that we saw portrayed. Was I meant to feel this way, or did I read too much into everything? I’ll let you decide.

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