Adding Horror to the 60s Pt 2

I have finished reading Lovecraft Country, and what can I say besides how fantastic the book was. I understand why it was made into a TV show; I just hope it did the book justice. Even though the stories are seemingly disjointed, there is a very clean wrap-up at the end.

One of the things I enjoyed most about this book is the realism. Sometimes when there are supernatural elements in stories, you have to suspend disbelief to a great extent. Some aspects of the story are based on stereotypes which are not very hard to believe that there would be people who believed in that sort of thing, such as the Magic Negro. Yet still surprising you enough the everything would still come as a surprise as you didn’t know what story. No black person died during this book, which is a plus. Also, I love a good villain to hate. What could be better?

Adding Horror to the 60s Pt 1

Spoopy season is continued by my reading of seemingly connected horror stories. I’ve taken the adage to heart: if they make an adaptation, it must be good. I’m confident that no one has said that, but I’m pretty sure that is the only reason why I’m reading Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff was turned into a TV show. So far, the book is fantastic. I do not want to put the book down between stories, but I have tests to study for and experiments to conduct.

One thing that I love about the book is that stories revolve around Black people. It varies rare to consume something within the genre that doesn’t evolve all the black people dying or lasting the entire situation only to die at the end. Giving the setting of 1960s America, the realism of the characterization and character interaction adds to the horror in a very Get Out way. If that movie was not an inspiration in some way, I would be surprised. I guess I’ll have to wait a bit to get through the rest of the saga.

A Not-so Scary Classic

I decided that my first post for this year’s spoopy season would be a classic. I think that almost everyone knows about The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Whether it’s from watching the Disney movie, watching the apocalypse-based TV series, or just everyone’s general knowledge of the horror that is the headless horseman. I don’t think you can go a Halloween season without this story being pushed in front of you, but I would like to posit that this is not the horror story that we were lead to believe it is.

I will agree that the book’s atmosphere is perfect, but probably not in the way you were imagining. If anything, this should be a story of karmic retribution against a terrible person who got exactly what they deserved. Everyone has grown to love Ichabod Crane from his many iterations, myself included. Still, man, is he a terrible person, and we should not celebrate him the way we have.

Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 6

I have read the sixth, and what probably should have been the final, book of the Oz series. Everything was wrapped up cleanly, and there really didn’t need to be anything more. The perfect thing happened: Uncle Henry and Aunt Em finally believe Dorothy and do not think she is telling stories or incapable of understanding reality, respectively. Also, having adults argue with chickens on chick-rearing was never something I ever expected to read.
Again, in the Oz fashion, we are on an exploration around the fairylands that Oz also inhabits and meet the many different creatures. This was more interesting than the previous book since we saw how these creatures interacted within the bigger narrative within the world rather than just showing up. Also, there is a bit of action that I can not tell without spoiling a large portion of the book, but it does help with the overall world-building. Overall, this was a cute book.

Utopic Dystopian Pt 4

I have reached the final book of The Giver Quartet. And it must be my favorite of the entire series. Son is the book that truly combines all three previous stories together. We follow Claire, a Birthmother from the community. She has a different experience from many other people: she feels love, and the only thing she wants is her child.

My favorite part of this book is the comparing aspect as Claire goes to different communities. Previously, you would have to go based on your memory of previous books to do this. This is the first time we experience going through all of these communities through the protagonist’s eyes. Each community has different ideas of how life should be left, so it’s interesting to see how interactions change based on new information.

I am honestly happy that I read this series, just for this book. This was the perfect ending I could have imagined for this series. Everything truly came full circle.

An Entirely New World Pt 1

My next foray into reading series that I should have gotten around to during my childhood is The Chronicles of Narnia. Now, Before reading this, I struggled in deciding in which order I should have read this series. After much deliberation and crying over making the wrong decision, I decided to read this series in publication order. You might be mad, but I do have my reasons for doing so at this time, which I may explain once I’m done. Because of that, the first book I’m reading is The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

The first time I read this book was because the movie was coming out. I had an ongoing deal with my mother to read a book before watching the associated film. Then, I didn’t really get the book’s allegorical nature. Still, even rereading it, I would not have noticed had I not known beforehand. Sometimes allegory can be heavy-handed, but in this book, it’s really subtle. Aslan is an allegory for Jesus for those not in the know, and I’ll let you go from there.

From what I remember of the movie, it was pretty accurate the writing. There wasn’t an epic battle scene, though. Also, the girls weren’t allowed to fight because, according to Santa, women just ruin battle. Thanks, Santa; the misogyny was very much needed. (All the sarcasm implied.)

Evil Mail Corps

I’ve never read a full-length tale about finding a conspiracy before, and I think this will be the last. Hearing snippets of what people say on Facebook is one thing, but this was just mindboggling. In all honesty, I’m still not sure of what I read from The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon.

From what I gathered, there were warring factions of postal carriers in the medieval period, and this is the story of finding this feud in a weird series of events. It was an interesting read. It just gave me a headache trying to keep up with all the information thrown at me. I’m not too sure what exactly I read, but maybe someone else can give it a try. I have no clue how you may feel after reading. Buyer beware.

Call the Wolves

Heartwarming is what I would like to call this book. At the same time, this book was heartbreaking. Throughout reading the book Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt, I was pulled in different directions concerning my feelings toward June and her unconventional family. The dialogue was realistic, and the family dynamics were so natural. Brunt did a fantastic job creating the characters for this story.

This book takes place in the late 1980s and surrounds the AIDS epidemic as June must confront that her uncle, whom she loves dearly, dies from the disease. She must learn to confront the world without the one person who understood her while discovering more about him along the way, making unconventional friendships. I think that anyone would love this beautifully written work of art.

Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 5

I have finally come up with the perfect archetype for who Dorothy Gale is. She is the type of child who will walk to an unmarked white van and ask for candy. I know this is supposed to be fiction, but you have to teach “Stranger Danger” at some point. Uncle Henry and Auntie Em need to lock her in her room.

I would say that this is the worst book of the series. It honestly feels that Baum only wrote this for the child fans. The last section of the book is literally just a list of the people who showed up at a birthday party. I felt myself going to sleep through my reading because nothing interesting happened. They would show up in a new country, get asked for an invitation to the party before continuing on their way. Also, Shaggy Man is such an imaginative name.

Here’s to the next book is something worth reading.

Utopic Dystopian Pt 3

Reading Lois Lowry’s Messenger gave me much to think about along the way. Also, this is the first time we’ve gotten the indication that the stories are connected instead of their own stand-alone novels. This makes the world so much more interesting. There are so many of these community settings within what could be considered walking distance from one another.

This story follows our favorite ruffian from the previous book, Matty, as he deals with the new village he has been living in since the last book. There is not much I can talk about without giving much away within this book. Still, there is somewhat of a timeless quality about it that strikes some of the conversation topics we discuss today, such as immigration and refugees. It was interesting looking at those topics from the point of view of this universe.

I am on the last book, and I’m hoping the ending is just as beautiful that this book ended up being.

%d bloggers like this: