Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 6

I have read the sixth, and what probably should have been the final, book of the Oz series. Everything was wrapped up cleanly, and there really didn’t need to be anything more. The perfect thing happened: Uncle Henry and Aunt Em finally believe Dorothy and do not think she is telling stories or incapable of understanding reality, respectively. Also, having adults argue with chickens on chick-rearing was never something I ever expected to read.
Again, in the Oz fashion, we are on an exploration around the fairylands that Oz also inhabits and meet the many different creatures. This was more interesting than the previous book since we saw how these creatures interacted within the bigger narrative within the world rather than just showing up. Also, there is a bit of action that I can not tell without spoiling a large portion of the book, but it does help with the overall world-building. Overall, this was a cute book.

Utopic Dystopian Pt 4

I have reached the final book of The Giver Quartet. And it must be my favorite of the entire series. Son is the book that truly combines all three previous stories together. We follow Claire, a Birthmother from the community. She has a different experience from many other people: she feels love, and the only thing she wants is her child.

My favorite part of this book is the comparing aspect as Claire goes to different communities. Previously, you would have to go based on your memory of previous books to do this. This is the first time we experience going through all of these communities through the protagonist’s eyes. Each community has different ideas of how life should be left, so it’s interesting to see how interactions change based on new information.

I am honestly happy that I read this series, just for this book. This was the perfect ending I could have imagined for this series. Everything truly came full circle.

An Entirely New World Pt 1

My next foray into reading series that I should have gotten around to during my childhood is The Chronicles of Narnia. Now, Before reading this, I struggled in deciding in which order I should have read this series. After much deliberation and crying over making the wrong decision, I decided to read this series in publication order. You might be mad, but I do have my reasons for doing so at this time, which I may explain once I’m done. Because of that, the first book I’m reading is The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

The first time I read this book was because the movie was coming out. I had an ongoing deal with my mother to read a book before watching the associated film. Then, I didn’t really get the book’s allegorical nature. Still, even rereading it, I would not have noticed had I not known beforehand. Sometimes allegory can be heavy-handed, but in this book, it’s really subtle. Aslan is an allegory for Jesus for those not in the know, and I’ll let you go from there.

From what I remember of the movie, it was pretty accurate the writing. There wasn’t an epic battle scene, though. Also, the girls weren’t allowed to fight because, according to Santa, women just ruin battle. Thanks, Santa; the misogyny was very much needed. (All the sarcasm implied.)

Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 5

I have finally come up with the perfect archetype for who Dorothy Gale is. She is the type of child who will walk to an unmarked white van and ask for candy. I know this is supposed to be fiction, but you have to teach “Stranger Danger” at some point. Uncle Henry and Auntie Em need to lock her in her room.

I would say that this is the worst book of the series. It honestly feels that Baum only wrote this for the child fans. The last section of the book is literally just a list of the people who showed up at a birthday party. I felt myself going to sleep through my reading because nothing interesting happened. They would show up in a new country, get asked for an invitation to the party before continuing on their way. Also, Shaggy Man is such an imaginative name.

Here’s to the next book is something worth reading.

Personal Legend

It’s rare that a book really makes me think. Especially a fictional. While this book may come across as woo-woo (if that’s even a word), but at the same time, it had a compelling statement. This story is The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

All the religious talk aside, it is very much about fulfilling a personal philosophy that is much bigger than oneself. I believe this is something that everyone can get behind. It also got me right in the feels because there is some truth about what the book says. It sometimes feels like the world is against you, and there’s no point when you look at the rest of what is around you. This book really just convinces you to keep going for your dreams with a really compelling and beautiful story. My dad recommended this book years ago, but I never really got around to it. So I’m happy that I finally have.

Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 4

After reading the fourth book, the wizard has a name, and his initials are, in fact, O.Z. It always confused me as to whether the country was named after him or named after the country. Nope, his parents obviously had big plans for him. Also, never understood why this book was called “…in Oz” when this book does not occur in Oz for the most part.

In fact, this book talks about a journey to try to get to Oz. Dorothy is on her way to visit Uncle Henry after being by herself for a while, because ten-year-old girls don’t need any kind of adult supervision, when she and her cousin, Zeb, fall into the center of the earth after an earthquake. This time, the two are trying to get to safety from the horror movie-esque characters we meet along the way, along with some friends that we are well aware of. To be honest not much happens, just some world-building of surrounding the country of Oz and some history, that would have been great to know a couple of books ago, but this book is short and sweet. The murder trial was also exciting.

Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 3

After reading the third book in the series, Dorothy has a last name for herself. We should congratulate her. In this book, Dorothy is on an adventure to another magical place: Australia. I’m kidding, sort of. She traverses this new world with a chicken who doesn’t believe a single thing Dorothy says. I mean, I agree entirely with the talking chicken when she says there is no such thing as talking animals. It’s just ridiculous.

Anyway, in this book, we do get to see the new land of Ev. I think Baum had a thing about naming countries with only two letters. The magic is slightly different from Oz’s, but interesting nonetheless as we go on another adventure to find Dorothy a way home as we are joined with the return of other fun characters. I personally felt there were way more characters in the book than necessary, but that was the purpose of the quest, in a way. It was weird picturing all these characters interacting, especially toward the end. Overall I thought it was a good book. Just don’t see why the book was titled as it was.

Up in the Clouds Pt 2

After reading the book after The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom, I’m back where the question everyone was asking gets answered: What happened to that one girl? Through the entirety of the first book, you’re not even sure of her name, but you want to know. This book is her story.

This book is an even bigger whirlwind adventure than the first one. Even knowing the basic premise from the first book, this book will still wholly blow your mind as you go through the book. The first book will not thoroughly prepare you for what this book will teach with its different lessons to be introduced to our protagonist. You want to keep find out more about her. This book kept me on the edge of my seat the whole time. If you enjoyed the first, you’ll love this one as well.

Along that Yellow Brick Road Pt 2

I am back after reading the second book in the Oz series. The author decided to forget about Dorothy for a while and give the Tin Man a name and pretend that he had a name the entire time. His name’s Nick Chopper, but the way. This time, we follow a boy named Tip as he runs away from the witch who’s been raising him all his life for a chance of adventure followed by a walking, talking Jack-o-Lantern and a horse made from wood. It’s Oz, so are we expecting anything else. A man accidentally cutting all his limbs off didn’t get us to question anything.

In this book, the craziness continues with more fun, lovable characters being some we’ve met before, with just a dash of sexism. The world is saved when the women go back to the kitchen because the men find the work way too hard and are not good at it. I wish I was kidding. Considering the ending, it’s bizarre and out of place, but we will have to leave it at that, so I don’t spoil it for you.

I will be back with the next book, eventually… I just need to get rid of the image of a talking bug who won’t stop with the puns.

It’s Elementary

I am usually not a big fan of disjointed narratives. I want my story to be laid out to not jump around because it doesn’t keep me engaged all that much, especially when narrators go on unnecessary tangents. In this book, I didn’t mind at all. The narrator goes on a tangent about Sherlock Holmes, but I was completely there for it. It was so in character that I found it adorable instead of annoying like I usually would. The curious incident of the dog in the night-time by Mark Haddon was just too adorable of a book not to want to recommend.

This story follows Christopher, an autistic young boy, as he goes on an adventure to figure out who killed his neighbor’s dog. Considering the author’s background and comments from other people with children on the spectrum, I would say that this is an accurate portrayal of a child on the spectrum that felt completely human instead of alien, like some writers fail to do. I was cheering along with the kid and didn’t mind his tangents because they built him more as a real person instead of a caricature. Do note that the chapters are not in standard numerical order. The book starts on chapter two, as Christopher loves prime numbers, and since this was written like a journal, it was very fitting. I would definitely pick this book up and give it a try.

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