Adding Horror to the 60s Pt 1

Spoopy season is continued by my reading of seemingly connected horror stories. I’ve taken the adage to heart: if they make an adaptation, it must be good. I’m confident that no one has said that, but I’m pretty sure that is the only reason why I’m reading Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff was turned into a TV show. So far, the book is fantastic. I do not want to put the book down between stories, but I have tests to study for and experiments to conduct.

One thing that I love about the book is that stories revolve around Black people. It varies rare to consume something within the genre that doesn’t evolve all the black people dying or lasting the entire situation only to die at the end. Giving the setting of 1960s America, the realism of the characterization and character interaction adds to the horror in a very Get Out way. If that movie was not an inspiration in some way, I would be surprised. I guess I’ll have to wait a bit to get through the rest of the saga.

Cold Reality

Books have a way of punching you in the face, leaving you bleeding, and coming back for more to kick you while you are down. This is how Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck made me feel so many things within a short timeframe. I was one of those people who was someone who wasn’t spoiled, but this was a remarkable story.

This was short and sweet and so beautifully written. I could visually see everything with how descriptive the setting was. I would consider this must-read, but do consider the period this story was written. There is some language that is no longer acceptable.

When the Movie is as Good as the Book

Recently I have finished reading¬†The Princess Bride, the book that I have been meaning to read for a long time, but never did. Now that I have, I’m upset that I never did before. Can I say it was anything other than amazing? At this point, I’m going to cross between the book and the movie, because how can I not. I have seen the movie so many times, and I always loved it. I think that the reason that I didn’t read the book was that I didn’t want to hate the movie after reading the book. I couldn’t have been more wrong. The book was amazing, and it just made me love the movie even more, especially when I noticed lines of dialogue that I remember word for word from the movie (you know, that one thing that every fangirl and fanboy rejoices over). The one part of the book that I wasn’t a fan of was when the author would butt into the story. Since the book version that is well known is the abridged “good parts” version, it was helpful when the author explains why he took things out of the book (because there was apparently entire chapters were nothing happened). Other times… he spoils the plot. Had I not watched the movie, there are things that I wouldn’t expect from the genre. It was annoying, but I knew I wasn’t as annoyed as I would have been had I never learned the plot before. Since that is my only grievance, you can honestly skip his notes and pretty much miss nothing. Also, about halfway through the book, he says that he wrote an extra scene. There is no extra scene because of legal issues. If you look for it, all you will find is an apology letter. Trust me, I tried to look for it. But I would definitely¬†recommend that you read this book.


Also, if you have some books that you would like my take on, recommend it to be in the comments. I’m always looking for books to read (even if there are about 1500 books currently on my GoodReads to-read list (I’m not even ashamed about that)). Also, if you want to check out my lists of books, go right ahead. Just know, my book list is a no-judgment zone.

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